Amel Amel

1989 Amel 48' Maramu

MARION

MARION

1989 Amel

48' Maramu-MARION

For Sale

Flag of Registry:

World Cruiser

$ 119,000 USD

Overview

The Amel Yachts are designed and built to be the optimum world cruiser for a couple. Safety and the ability to be operated by one person is one of its top priorities. “Marion” is a ketch rig with electric furling on the main and jib. The boat is fitted with a hard dodger offering a well-protected comfortable cockpit for offshore cruising. All sailing functions are designed to be operated from the cockpit for safety while sailing to your paradise destination. There are many features that make Amels unique yachts.

Cruising speed under power: 8 knots. Economical speed under power: 7 knots. Maximum speed under power: 8.6 knots. Range at cruising speed: 600. Range at economical speed 900 miles. Customs tonnage (certif. No 2571) 20.85 tons. Approved by French Merchant Navy 1st. Category

Amels are focused, oceangoing machines not dock queens to be tucked ashore at the slightest breeze. The 48 Maramu is truly a classic ready to circumnavigate shorthanded or singlehanded.

"Marion" is hull # 264 of this world famous model and probably one of the three last Maramu's built before they stop their production in favor of the larger model: the 53' Super Maramu.  She's not a represented as a beauty queen nor as an offshore-equipped yacht, but as one of the latest and best models ever of the Maramu line in need of TLC and equipment; therefore  her current owner has provided enough room on her price to allow for large upgrades and still not breaking the bank.

Gallery

Quick Specs

Type: Sail

Year: 1989

Beam: 13' 2"

LOD: 46' 3"

Cabins:2

Heads: 2

Maximum Speed (knots): 9

Cruise Speed (knots): 8

Range NMI: 600

Fuel Type: Diesel

Hull Material: Fiberglass

Stabilizers: None

Fuel Tank Capacity (Gallons): 135

Fresh Water Capacity (Gallons): 264

Holding Tank Capacity (Gallons): 20

Engines

Engine 1

  • Engine Make: Perkins
  • Engine Model: 4-154
  • Engine Year: 1989
  • Engine Type: Inboard
  • Drive Type: Direct
  • Power HP: 63.00
  • Power KW: 46.98
  • Fuel Type: Diesel
  • Hours: 0.00

Engine 2

Full Details

Accommodations

This rugged and safe cruising boat has a deep protected cockpit with a strong fiberglass dodger, which protects the helmsman at all times and in all weathers. There is exceptional ventilation for cabin comfort. The forward stateroom easily converts from two oversized single berths to a large double or a single when needed. This cabin has access to the forward head and shower.

Continuing aft, the main salon is next with convertible dinette to port that sleeps two, and settee to starboard, which sleeps one. Immediately aft of the settee is the full sized navigation station, which has ample room for all electronics and navigation aids. To port and aft of the convertible dinette is the galley, which has been designed to be efficient and practical at sea or at anchor.

The owner's stateroom is all the way aft and features a full size double berth with ample storage below. This stateroom has an en-suite head and shower and a spacious hanging locker.

All sails, fenders and dock lines are stored in deck accessed lockers and never get into the interior spaces of the boat. Safety features include a watertight locker isolating the stem and a watertight door isolating the whole fore portion of the boat. Outside safety features include a stainless steel fixed pulpit and a rudder that is able to support the boat's weight.

 

Accommodations and Saloon details

The interior accommodation is well maintained and finished in burl cut plantation grown African mahogany and the overhead is cream colored vinyl. The companionway ladder from the main saloon to the cockpit deck is only three steps with rises similar to those in your home removing the need to turn and climb down a steep ladder backwards into the interior from the cockpit. You pass below facing the direction you are going with ease and safety at sea. Hand holds are everywhere making this a very comfortable vessel to spend time below.

 

Forward Guest Cabin and Head

At the forepeak there is a large chain locker with a water tight bulkhead hatch allowing chain inspection. Aft of the chain locker is the forward V-berth with filler panel that converts the V-berth into a large double berth. Both berths have leeboards and lift to access storage. The large hatch overhead allows access to the foredeck. A bug screen can be placed. 110v 30a service is available to starboard. Aft and to port of this space is the in cabin head with many storage area bins. The toilet is a Groco K model in cream color to match the cream vinyl. Shower water drains to the engine room bilge. To starboard from the forward head is a spacious hanging closet. Overhead in this compartment is a switch panel for mast lights, access to VHF antenna leads, 110v 30a outlet with circuit breaker, 12v outlet and 220v 50 Hz outlet. The forward spaces are separated from the main saloon space by a water tight collision bulkhead that can be dogged down similar to a submarine hatch.

  • V-berth
  • Large overhead hatch with shade and screen
  • Hanging closet- in cabin head

 

Main Salon

The main saloon features settees to port and starboard of the saloon table. The port settee lifts to access storage space and has a filler board that converts the port settee into a double berth. The starboard settee lifts to access to more copious storage space and can be converted to a pilot berth by deploying the backrest to the leeboard position. The saloon table has two leaves, one hinged to port and one that is fitted to the starboard side allowing the table to seat six comfortably. Inside the saloon table and accessed from the starboard side is space for beverage bottles and glasses. The aft end of the saloon table contains drawers for silver and miscellaneous galley tools. All living spaces have dry under deck storage compartments.  A passageway leads aft from the navigation station and passes between the sealed engine space and the fuel tank. The passageway houses the extension table for the main saloon. Above the fuel tank is located a 120v 60 Hz charger.

 

Owners Cabin and Head

The owner's stateroom has an ensuite head to port containing a deep sink with extendable faucet for showering and a Groco K toilet in cream to match the cream vinyl.  Doors close off outboard storage spaces on the port and starboard sides surrounding the berth. To the port side of the bed is a vanity with chair and sliding mirror. Two Hella fans ventilate the area and heat is supplied through vents. Both 12v and 120V 60 Hz are available. A compass is located on the mid cabin bulkhead over the vanity. Aft of the stateroom at the port stern corner is a cubby. Under the berth is access to the steering rams, steering processors and additional dry storage space.

Construction

All Amels, since 1967, have been built with Amel designed biaxial fiberglass cloth. This is a flat woven fiberglass cloth that is much stronger in sheer and tension than conventional mat and woven roving laminates. The hull is molded in one piece incorporating one piece/non-spliced lengths of biaxial cloth running from bulwark, down through the keel/centerline, and up to the opposite bulwark. In the same fashion the next series of laminates run from the bow lengthwise to the stern, again, employing one piece/non-spliced length of biaxial cloth. The deck assembly is built in a similar fashion. While the hull is a sold fiberglass laminate with no core, the deck assembly employs a core of vertical end grain balsa in strategic horizontal areas to enhance stiffness and is insulation from heat and noise. There are also substrates of "Iron Wood" in the deck assembly where cleats and the windlass are installed to easily accommodate the increased compression and shearing loads in the foredeck. After all the structural assemblies are completely install, the separately completed deck assembly is joined to the hull, (again, while it is still in the mold) with six layers of the same biaxial cloth used in the primary lamination, around the entire hull to deck interface. What is accomplished, effectively, is the elimination of a conventional hull to deck joint. The hull and deck are married with a homogeneous fiberglass matrix, which insures a strong and lee free hull and deck join for the entire life of the vessel. All 1000 liters/264 gallons of fresh water are carried in the stub keel, not only providing a double bottom but keeping the weight of the water quite low in the boat and not in tanks under settees. The propeller extends from a secondary fin aft of the keel and is a three blade type, offering great reduction in prop walk in forward and sternway.  The rudder is hung from a massive full-length skeg assembly that can support the entire stern laden weight of the vessel in case of grounding. As in all elements of the entire vessel's design, the hull and deck were conceived to do their job properly and efficiently and not to have a certain look or to make a fashion statement. In cruising yacht design, as in nature, the most satisfactory results are achieved when form follows function.

Galley

The galley is as close to the center of roll, pitch and yaw axis as one can get. Standing at the galley double sink you are low in the hull and all moves around you in those three dimensions of movement. It is calming and secure and that position gives access to the pots and pans locker under the galley sink, galley tool drawers behind you in the saloon table, sloped dry sink to your right, and spice and oil containing spaces for your immediate cooking needs. There is a double stainless steel sink into which hot and cold fresh water, sea water and foot controlled drinking water can be pumped.  The deep storage area to port of the sink and to aft of the cooker is accessed by a removable hatch. A Norcold DE-490 front open refrigerator/freezer is located between the galley sink and the stove. The stove is a two burner by ENO.  A sling can be attached to each side of the stove to assist the cooker operator while on a port tack in challenging seas.  Outboard of the settees are storage compartments with sliding access doors. 

Electronics

To starboard of the galley is the navigation station that is easily viewed from the cockpit keeping all navigation electronics dry and safe. The navigation station has a large chart containment space, is flanked to aft by a pull drawer and under the desk are two sliding doors containing space for files. The navigation station contain:

  • Furuno 24 miles radar
  • Furuno GPS
  • B&G Hydra 2 Depth Sounder
  • VHF radio
  • Stereo w/cassette player
  • Furuno SOC SSB radio
  • Inclinometer

 

Electrical

The 12v ships engine start system draws from, 2 115 Amps lead acid batteries that are charged by a engine driven alternator. This battery group is isolated from the house system and can be included in the house system by the battery selector switch. The batteries are secured and locked down. All five batteries are deep cycle and can be easily relocated within the array depending on use. The 12v house system draws for four 115 a lead acid batteries that can be charged in many ways: by a 12v 100 Amps engine driven alternator, by one or two solar panels in the array managed by a three step regulator or by the 120v 60 Hz automatic charger when taking shore power overseas.

While connected to 110v 60 Hz shore power, A.C. voltage flows to a master breaker panel then to a secondary A.C. panel with switches for the refrigerator and the water heater.  When and at sea the solar panel regulator diverts excess power to the water heater and the Norcold refrigerator automatically switches from 110v 60 Hz to ship D.C. There are two 110v 60 Hz 30a power cables and a 125/250v 60 Hz to two 30a pigtail "Y" Adapter for connecting to large yacht shore power in the U.S.

Sails & Rigging

An inner stay from the main mast can be rigged to just forward of the windlass from which a number of sail combinations are flown.  Four sails can be easily flown on beam and broad reaches.  Block and tackle preventers were added to both the main and mizzen booms, along with a main traveler control system led to the cockpit on both sides of the hard dodger and to the Harken winches. This system affords complete control over jibes from the safety of the cockpit. One does not have to head up into the wind to shorten sail as with some in mast roller furling systems. Reefing this traditional rig is quick and easy. A spinnaker pole can be easily deployed to maintain jib clew placement opposite from the prevented main boom. 

Cockpit

The companionway hatch is a guillotine like device that lowers out of the way allowing easy access from the cockpit to the Saloon without the problem of manipulating slat boards or leaking side by side swing doors. This hatch is double locked from the outside and single locked from the inside preventing unwanted intrusion while below.  The open hatch gives visual access to the Nav desk from the wheel. The cockpit is situated deep within the vessel for enhanced security and to minimize the undesirable motion experienced in high mounted center cockpits and stern cockpits in lumpy seas. The steering station is in the forward port side quarter of the cockpit where it can be completely protected from sun, spray, rain and other undesirable environmental conditions and flying fish. This is the living space while at sea or at anchor and it performs well. The helm seat is a saddle like structure supported by a vertical stainless steel pole that is an excellent hand hold. The mizzen, main, and port jib sheets can be managed by one person from a position immediately to the port of the mizzen while seated in the safety of the dry cockpit.   Under the cockpit is the easy to access stand up engine space.

Deck, Hull and Cockpit equipmnt

  • NEW bottom paint April 2017
  • Emergency tiller
  • Lee boards forward, aft and pilots berth
  • Whale manual bilge pump
  • Companionway step
  • Bilge alarm
  • 2 electric bilge pumps, one automatic
  • Stove gas safety solenoid
  • 2 watertight bulkheads
  • Double bottom around keel
  • Stainless tube life rails
  • Masthead tri color light
  • Deck level running lights
  • Masthead anchor light

Ventilation

When at anchor with the bow into the breeze, open the three Goiot overhead hatches (forward stateroom, forward head area, and saloon) and close the cockpit companionway hatch. Goiot hatches are manufactured to not leak. No duct tape will be needed to secure these hatches at sea. Open the hatch at the extreme aft end of the owner's cabin, and enjoy exceptional natural flow through ventilation.

Additional Information

The Amel Maramu 46 is Henri Amel and Jacques Carteau designed, Chantiers Amel built. While company literature designates her as the Maramu 48, she is better known as the Maramu 46. Amel introduced the Maramu design in 1976 based on “our experiences with the Euros 41′ and Meltem 53′.” By 1985, they had produced 200 hulls and made a switch, adding in-mast furling and articulating whisker poles. As always when Amel made a change, they never looked back. All future Amels would come with in-mast furling units. They make clean breaks and limit options to a minimal set. If you are looking for a custom design to outfit your desire, Amels are not it. Amels are focused, oceangoing machines not dock queens to be tucked ashore at the slightest breeze. The 46 Maramu is truly a classic ready to circumnavigate shorthanded or singlehanded. Amel stopped production of the 46 in 1989. The design lineage continued on with the Maramu name and in the 1990’s introduced the 52/53 Super Maramu.

 

First Impressions

Amel designs are very distinctive in appearance as well as function. Starting forward, the Maramu 46’s bow has a longer than usual overhang, increased freeboard, and nice bow chock. She has a distinctive white gel coat color. The foredeck leads to a low profile, sloping cabintrunk with long rectangular portholes. The center cockpit has a hard dodger. Aft of the center cockpit is a high profile, symetrical, trunk cabin with long rectangular portholes. This aft cabin trunk is the most distinctive trait and allows for nice headroom below. The Maramu has a counter stern with a slightly reverse transom and two handle like steps. The freeboard slopes upward steadily from stern to stem. Underneath, Amels have a long fin keel and skeg hung rudder. In fact, Mr. Amel is credited as responsible for the popularity of this underbody. Aloft is the traditional ketch rig of Amels. The decks come covered with faux teak.

 

Construction

All Amels, since 1967, have been built with Amel designed biaxial fiberglass cloth. This is a flat woven fiberglass cloth that is much stronger in sheer and tension than conventional mat and woven roving laminates. The hull is molded in one piece incorporating one piece/non-spliced lengths of biaxial cloth running from bulwark, down through the keel/centerline, and up to the opposite bulwark. In the same fashion the next series of laminates run from the bow lengthwise to the stern, again, employing one piece/non-spliced length of biaxial cloth. The deck assembly is built in a similar fashion. While the hull is a solid fiberglass laminate with no core, the deck assembly employs a core of vertical end grain balsa in strategic horizontal areas to enhance stiffness and is insulation from heat and noise. There are also substrates of “Iron Wood” in the deck assembly where cleats and the windlass are installed to easily accommodate the increased compression and shearing loads in the foredeck.

After all the structural assemblies are completely install, the separately completed deck assembly is joined to the hull, (again, while it is still in the mold) with six layers of the same biaxial cloth used in the primary lamination, around the entire hull to deck interface. What is accomplished, effectively, is the elimination of a conventional hull to deck joint. The hull and deck are married with a homogeneous fiberglass matrix, which insures a strong and lee free hull and deck join for the entire life of the vessel. All 1000 liters/264 gallons of fresh water are carried in the stub keel, not only providing a double bottom but keeping the weight of the water quite low in the boat and not in tanks under settees. The propeller extends from a secondary fin aft of the keel and was originally a fixed 3 blade prop and tapered nut is stored in the space under the steering hydraulic motors. The rudder is hung from a massive full-length skeg assembly that can support the entire stern laden weight of the vessel in case of grounding. As in all elements of the entire vessel’s design, the hull and deck were conceived to do their job properly and efficiently and not to have a certain look or to make a fashion statement. In cruising yacht design, as in nature, the most satisfactory results are achieved when form follows function.

 

What To Look For In 1985 or later models:

Amel switched to in-mast furling standard on the Maramu 46. With time Amel perfected this change, but initially there were issues with the externally manufactured mainsail furling unit. Amel would go on to design and manufacturer their current in-house furling units which are far superior. It can be gently argued that the earlier Maramu 46’s with standard rigs are preferred over the post-1985 units until the very last Maramus which had the Super Maramu, in-house designed furling units that are so exceptional and maintenance free. Post 1985 yachts added other features such as articulating whisker poles. Amel is well known to limit the available options. Amel has a focused audience that integrates design, manufacturing, and purpose. Amel builds one design for one purpose in one way. They build serious ocean going passagemakers with the exact equipment needed. Amel does not offer many options, and those offered are of lesser importance. They manufacture all equipment in-house. And they endlessly offer support. Even back to their earliest models, you can contact Amel and purchase replacement parts.

On Deck

Amel uses a polyester material in the form of teaklatting to cover their decks.  The cost of installation and maintenance is much less expensive than real teak which is an overwhelming attraction. It may prove that Henri Amel was really a visionary in so many ways.

On the foredeck of the Maramu, the lockers rise up for a lip. These chain lockers drain to the sump and stay bone dry. The coach roof has a forward facing hatch which provides excellent ventilation. By opening this hatch, two others, and closing the companionway, a welcome ventilation flows through the whole interior. The key is closing the companionway hatch. Along the stanchions are clever circular cleats port and starboard. These are useful for securing whisker poles or tying up to a pier. Along the side decks the plastic portholes are encased in a stainless framing that illustrates the high quality and attention to detail of Amel construction. Many builders directly bolt plastic portholes to the trunk leading to leaks. Past the cockpit the cabin trunk again rises up. Excellent cleats provide ease of line handling. A nice center line winch is handy for tender stowage. An electric winch would be an upgrade. The last three Amel Maramu’s have a very large aft locker like the one on the Super Maramu.

The true center cockpit is nestled deep between the mizzen and main, the fore and aft coach roofs. It is a very safe, ocean going cockpit that is designed for shorthanded sailing. With the autopilot going, one person can safely maneuver a Maramu 46 through the trickiest of channels and sail offshore with perfect balance. Hard dodgers are standard on all Amels along with the captains chair and companionway mounted controls. The companionway sill is a good foot high with a guillotine style door that slides below.

Amel 48 Layout

Down Below

The interior joinery work is beautiful dark mahogany, mostly solid, with a real teak and holly floor. As you walk down the modest stairway to down below, you notice that unlike the Super Maramu, the galley on 46 Maramu opens up to the saloon. It is not a long U-shaped enclosure but an L-shaped layout. This was a fundamental change Amel later made. Just to starboard of the companionway is a water tank meter. This consists of simply a buoyant stick and scale which will never fail. All the way forward is a V-berth that provides two sea berths with lee boards. The master head is to port with the traditional hanging closet starboard side. The forward head and V-berth close off behind a watertight bulkhead. The saloon has an L-shaped dinette arrangement to starboard and settee port side. The Super Maramu has two cute love seats instead with frilly French upholstery. The afore mentioned galley is starboard with the nav station to port abreast of the companionway. To get to the master stateroom, you walk through starboard side. This walkthrough steps down and up beneath the low set cockpit. The suite aft consists of a characteristic U-shaped berth, excellent storage, and headroom. An en suite head and shower are port side.

Engine and Underway

The engine room is beneath the cockpit sole. Unlike on the newer versions, the Maramu 46 lacks the hydraulic supports which ease lifting of this heavy hatch. The standard 63HP Perkins 4-154 is a venerable engine which is still in many. When property maintained, the 4-154 will last virtually forever and 10,000 hours should not necessarily rule one out. The real problem is that replacement parts are getting harder to find. To aerate the enclosed space, there are two fans. One to port blows in fresh air while another to starboard vacates hot air. The airflow is of great importance for an enclosed engine such as on Amels. The steering system on the original Maramu 46’s was a gear type. An amazingly easy upgrade is to a hydraulic system. Because of the fore thought of Chantiers Amel, the installation is a simple drop-in replacement. The mizzen and main sail plan on the Maramu 46 is simple to sail for two and, with an autopilot and experience, singlehandable. The main and jib balance each other when sailing wing on wing. A Maramu flying both mizzen and main gennakers is truly a beautiful sight.

Conclusion

The Amel Maramu 46 is a yacht ready to sail the seven seas in comfort and safety. The most important difference between individuals is the in-mast furling. Mark I version have standard rigs while post 1985 Amel switched to in-mast furling. The value depends heavily on condition and equipment.



The Company offers the details of this vessel in good faith but cannot guarantee or warrant the accuracy of this information nor warrant the condition of the vessel. A buyer should instruct his agents, or his surveyors, to investigate such details as the buyer desires validated. This vessel is offered subject to prior sale, price change, or withdrawal without notice. This listing is a courtesy of a member of the International Yacht Brokers Association and may be centrally listed with another broker. It is offered as a convenience by this broker/dealer to its clients and is not intended to convey representation of a particular vessel.

Contact Broker

For more information about this yacht contact SYS Yacht Sales.
We look forward to working with you!

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Sarasota FL 34236 USA
Phone: 1-941-365-9095
Email: info@sysyachtsales.com
Website: https://sysyachtsales.com

"With over 30 years in the yacht sales industry, we specialize in new and used yachts for sale ranging from 30 to 200+ feet. Experience why our clients say they will never go anywhere else...Experience the SYS Difference!"

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